Writing – Dish by Dish

"Ready to Roll-Rite"

I’m discovering I can take all day to do the dishes.  It works this way:  whenever I’m in the vicinity of the kitchen to get a snack or a hot drink, I add a small pile of dirty dishes to the soapy water waiting in the sink.  While the kettle boils I can wash half a dozen dishes, and while the tea steeps I can rinse them. It’s all done by hand because the building I live in is fifty years old and it was back then that women were well-dressed, well-aproned, dishwashers themselves.

Dish by dish, or “Bird by Bird”, as Anne Lamott would say in her book about the writing life, the process becomes more digestible, freer and easier to do when we break it down bit by bit. In Lamott’s words:

“I know some great writers; writers you love who write beautifully and have made a great deal of money, and not one of them sits down routinely feeling wildly enthusiastic and confident. Not one of them writes elegant first drafts. All right, one of them does, but we do not like her very much…Very few writers know what they’re doing until they’ve done it.”

I identify with the quote above and many of the subjects that are dear to Lamott’s heart. The following is an excerpt from Wikipedia:

“I try to write the books I would love to come upon, that are honest, concerned with real lives, human hearts, spiritual transformation, families, secrets, wonder, craziness – and that can make me laugh. When I am reading a book like this, I feel rich and profoundly relieved to be in the presence of someone who will share the truth with me, and throw the lights on a little, and I try to write these kinds of books. Books for me are medicine.”

“If books are medicine, then libraries are drugstores”. (N.R. Rigets)

Books have always comforted me.  Answers to my inner questions have been revealed page by page to provide me with wisdom I was lacking.   There would be times when I was desperate for a way to dissolve confusion, or to find a proven method to eradicate fears and anxiety. In each instance the library’s shelves offered many voices for me to choose from and a feeling of relief would result from knowing others had experienced similar feelings. I would become very excited by their printed words offering me new perspectives on life itself.

Books introduce me to new people when I read about artists and designers, coaches, anthropologists, writers, cooks, photographers, DIY experts, and individual biographies.  A lot of my reading is non-fiction so I can learn to do what others do that I haven’t tried yet.

This is how I came to learn about blogging.  Co-authored by Chris Garrett and Darren Rowse, “ProBlogger: Secrets for Blogging Your Way to a Six-Figure Income” caught my attention.  I was dissatisfied with my website:  I found it incomplete and static as many websites are.  The book explains that a blog is a particular type of website and that many blogs began as personal journals.  As an unrelenting journaler, and “a woman of the sheets” that’s all I needed to hear!  I began learning all I could about blogging and have reaped the satisfaction of conversation, community, and invitations to meet other bloggers at distant destinations in the future.

Many female bloggers feel endowed with a smooth sense of personal power from “owning” a blog.  It’s enriching and liberating.

  • There is a potential to get noticed in your business, and in community.  Fame is always a possibility.
  • A well-read blog puts you in touch with a wide variety of people; you can make contacts and network.

Noticing a relationship between books and blogs I can see why I feel great delving into either one of them, or both at once which happens most often.

"New Shoots"

Copyright © 2010 Nicole Rigets