“Play and Spark” of Modern Painting

“Even before lifting a brush the shape of this canvas excited me emotionally.”

"Untitled"  12"x36" Acrylic on Canvas
“Untitled” 12″x36″ Acrylic on Canvas

V. Vollrath  “Beautiful – like a vortex the eye is pulled into the black almost at the centre.”  

Critique Written by:  P.N.Waters

“It really is very fine… composition (reminiscent of early Mondrian) — of course. Besides that is the really great and I would say INTUITIVE use of color. The play and spark that is so often (almost always) missing from acrylic is here.

I use the word “intuitive” with care. So much painting these days is just PRETENDING to be “deconstructed” or even “abstract”. Most often it is hieroglyphic — symbols that are recognizable to a particular cogniscienti. In fact, that is the antithesis of “Abstraction”, and to be frank it is no more artistic than, say, printing currency.

THAT is why the signature is the most important aspect of most modern painting these days.

Whether it’s Jeff Koons balloon dogs, William Wegman’s real dogs, Damien Hirst’s multicolored spots, Jim Dine’s multicolored hearts, or Robert Motherwell monochromatic splotches — what we are really looking at is different varieties of money.

Your painting, whether a given person “likes” it or not has character and heart; things that only living things have. In fact, I would go so far to say that almost anyone would say they like this — same way they would “like”, say, Beethoven’s Ninth. Inspiring. No special knowledge or initiation required!

That means it’s Art, with a capital “A”. Money can never claim that, whatever the denomination. No matter what the signature on it that makes it a valuable commodity. A skull by Damien Hirst is just as cold and dead as can be, even if it is made out of diamonds.”

©2015 Nicole Rigets