Pass Me a *Pipe

Mens-Navy-Blue-Double-Breasted-BlazerA man’s blazer is a mark of the ‘establishment’ and differs from a sports jacket chiefly in the material. A blazer is made of a solid dark color, usually navy, sometimes black, and on occasion bottle green, or red.

Sports jackets have plastic or leather buttons whereas blazers are usually embellished with nautical-style brass or gold-tone buttons. The buttons should not be shiny or garish. If they are, detach them, and look into having them dipped in bleach to remove the lacquer finish and speed up tarnishing. A navy or black soft wool and cashmere blazer can be modernized by replacing the brass buttons with black horn.

Blazer Do’s96bfbb8573b35d11d46a116849f46c5e

Weddings

Dinner Dates

Films

Graduations

Brunches

Blazer Don’ts

Funerals

Job Interviews

Evenings at the Opera

IPOs http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Initial_public_offering

Brisses http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/brisses

MenInNavy6

Five Ways to Wear a Blazer

  • Relaxed, with an ivory white turtleneck sweater and jeans.
  • Classic, with mid-tone grey flannels, white dress shirt, and solid blue-red silk tie.
  • Funky, with a white vintage T-shirt, tooled leather belt, and jeans.
  • Collegiate, with a grey cashmere hoodie http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoodie, woven belt, and putty colored casual cotton pants.
  • Celebrity Style, with layers of denim; beginning with a bleached denim ‘cowboy’ shirt and a Levi’s medium blue denim jacket, studded leather belt, and off-white jeans.

*Pipe:  Optional

©2015 Nicole Rigets

Wise-ass Say-so Denim

"If it's Denim... it's Universal"
“If it’s Denim… it’s Universal”

Jeans are an invention of 19th century U.S.A. Initially conceived as rugged work pants by the founder of Levi Strauss they eventually became a symbol of rebellious youth in the fifties. In the late sixties jeans became a socially acceptable designer item and worn by well-to-do young in Europe.

A Men & Women’s Wise-Ass Neoteric Look:

Begin with Designer Jeans, worn with a striped shirt open at the neck, and paired with a noteworthy belt and Italian loafers. Choose a boldly colored and printed pocket square to contrast with the shirt. Pull the centre of the pocket square down and tuck it inside the back pocket of your jeans leaving the points out to give a loose relaxed effect.

Levi’s 501 are the celebrity jeans. Why? Because famous people, like Andy Warhol, wore them…

with…

check shirt, necktie, and blue blazer.

Bob Colacello, writer for Vanity Fair, has mentioned that it was Warhol”s colleague and friend, Fred Hughes, who birthed the combination of jeans with a suit jacket. Hughes had his 501’s washed and pressed every day so the seams were never crooked and there was no loose fabric on the thighs. Warhol was far more notorious than Hughes and so the “uniform” became known as the ‘Warhol Look’.

"Warhol WOW"
“Warhol WOW”

To keep 501’s true blue they should be dry cleaned, not washed.

Copyright © 2011 Nicole Rigets

 

Social Misperception and the “Greying of Your Spirit”

Stopping by the Newsstand before leaving Park Royal South and leafing through some Women’s Magazines:

“As we age we fall apart.” – Bullsh_t!!  As we age we stop learning at school, stop working out or playing sports.  We keep eating out… and drinking beer, wine, juice, and lattes, all laden with calories.  The preservatives laced into conventional foods bulge the middle outward.  No exercise leaves the muscles painful and the bones in poor condition.  No new ideas result in a flabby brain and slowed thinking or forgetfulness.

Stop believing the bull in women’s magazines about aging; the mags with the ads for all your body, mind, and spirit pains.  The articles are written primarily to promote the advertisements that fill you with unnecessary fears and tell you you need manufactured pills, medications or surgery.  Take action!! Keep your mind, body, and spirit healthy by avoiding the behaviors that harm them. Take responsibility for your life by following nature and nurture.  Avoid conventional stores and commercial products and tune out old wives tales… enjoy the freedom of being your own boss and running your own life.  I dare you to throw out your television and newspapers if you will.  I overhear more people talking about these as an absolute waste of time and invasion into their free time to think, read, paint, socialize, walk/run… take photographs, choose a new pet, phone a friend.  Your choices are unlimited… try some new ones.

I shake off the negativity from the “media salad” and start across the tiny bridge that connects the parking lot with the playing fields.  Walking home past the fields with a view to the ocean, I like seeing the beaver’s bare-stick igloo, and the way it displaces the water, causing new patterns of mud to form along the edge of the creek.

While visiting the mall I was keen to study a young Iranian woman in Artigiano early today.  She had it!!  Voice, power, posture, flash, tan, probably much cash; and she had only a few accessories that differed from mine.  Lime green richly hued T-shirt, white leather belt, her shirt was tucked in; hot heels, jeans, wavy, glossy black hair, attitude, cellular, dazzling teeth!  We both had designer sunglasses and my jeans are the cool Acne brand.  I could try a colored T-shirt, white belt (later I bought a red patent one made in Germany), high heels, and better handbag.  My hair is dramatic in the opposite way  and I’m fine with it.  I don’t like cell phones and don’t use one.  I could be taller with heels but she’s taller than my 5’6″. Stunning woman teaches me a lesson:  Shut up and Show Off !!

I had caught sight of myself in a plate glass window with a mean-spirit behind it and it threw me a reflection of my expression sagging.  I fell into disbelief and hurriedly turned my head and thoughts back to the soft pink lighting of the powder room at home and the mercifully flattering reflections emitted from a 1960’s mirror.  The mirrors in the make-up and clothing departments in stores are cuttingly cruel; a tired, worn, dark, expressionless face appears out of my stare and I’m forced to try on new colors and styles to become the mannequins  and the women on posters surrounding me.  Once in the door at home, I tried on the black capri-length tights and top I bought…  up-to-date and sexy.  I needed these.

"Oh My... perhaps I should have added this too!"

Grateful for hairpins to keep my hair out of my face, off the back of my neck, and above the bathwater.

Copyright © 2010 Nicole Rigets


Zilli Knits??!!

Zilli rifled through the pages of her journal looking over her writing.  There were only six empty pages, and then she’d slip into a new one, with a cover decorated in dried and pressed flowers. This Spring flowers would embellish every outfit and accessory.  Zilli kept an eye on the NYT fashion pages and felt  gutsy knowing she would be wearing her jeans with a wardrobe of striped shirts this season.  Full of confidence she chose to peruse a two year old entry from her journal written at a time when she wondered if she’d ever write for publication.  Here’s how it went:

A stay-at-home Saturday last week; Zilli’s favorite.  Sleep in, love up, afterglow (pink apple cheeks), oatmeal with fresh blueberries and strawberry applesauce, brush teeth, climb back onto bed beside Mac, admire the view, the birds, the white sail sailboats, start to read, fall asleep in the Saturday sunlight with some of the windows open to the sea breeze, wake up one and a half hours later, make lunch; big plate of fruit using one pear that tasted like liquor, a cara cara orange, grapefruit, cameo apple, and a mandarin orange…

Zilli and Mac ate sunflower seed butter on ancient grains bread made with spelt and kamut, lightly black salted, and served open face.  The French music radio station played fifties jazz. Incongruous as it seems, Zilli started to knit the pink mohair pullover she’d seen displayed at the wool shop in her neighborhood. Four double-size cotton candy balls of wool, bamboo needles, and a printout of the pattern were tucked into a clear plastic bag with a black shoulder strap and a smile. The only reason Zilli knew how to knit was due to her maternal grandmother who the family called, “Chickie,” so Zilli and her younger brother did too.  Chickie made heavy wool jackets with zippers up the front for each member of the family.  The Canadiana-style patterns always included snowflakes, deer, or elk on either side of the zipper; each above a knit pocket, and below a full collar. The jackets became a trend; smart looking, warm and beautifully made.  Quite the opposite of the relationship occurring between Zilli’s parents.  The  more the tension increased the more Chick knit, and knit, and the relationship still came unravelled.

The daylight dimmed and Zilli got up and washed all the dishes including the ones used the night before.  Why, she wondered could she not keep up with cooking and cleaning the way other people do?  This transitive thought did not stop her from making snacks for the movie at eight, her choice: “American Cousins.”  She couldn’t remember it now but had written, “loved it,” at the time.  She washed her face, made triphala tea, and sat down to write thinking maybe she should write for other people and stop writing for herself. Perhaps that’s waylaid thinking:   Zilli wondered if that was the reason her blue pen got damaged and had to be returned to France for reconditioning.  Very little had been written in her journal since she decided to stop whining in it.  Zilli stopped writing down her dreams once she noticed them becoming repetitious.  She was dreaming a lot but not taking a pad to bed to capture them.

It’s been suggested that a person write for 5 minutes as soon as they wake up.  She would try that for a change.  Change is what she felt she was about now.  Finally the old habits of mind just don’t work any more; they were stalling her and she knew it.  In order to gear up for progress in life a person has to think new, be fresh, open and eager to be the change they’ve made. “Be the change I’ve made!!” said Zilli to herself.  She came across a directive in a small coiled book from 2002 telling her to write a story and it wouldn’t have to be a story about her.  She gave this some serious thought.  She would buy a book, any drama in print, and alter the cover.  This would be her story:  appropriated, altered on the outside, and just like any other on the inside.

Satisfied with herself she got out her handbag, daubed some glue on the front and stuck an old metal belt buckle to it.  That would do until she went shopping in the morning for faux flowers to attach in a frame-like manner around the ornament. The keys to the Benz glinted against the white marble countertop, they knew Zilli would take them for a drive tomorrow.

Copyright © 2010 Nicole Rigets

What Jeans are You Wearing this Season?

The first question is: "What jeans are you wearing this season?"

It’s the beginning of the question session at Vancouver College of Art and Design.  I have been invited to talk to Fashion Merchandising students about my art and process by Jannette Maedel who is teaching these students fashion writing.

  • I wear Acne jeans!

Is the beginning of your design process the same every time?  Describe your process.

  • My process is always changing and evolving; fueled by my emotional nature.

Where do you get your inspiration from?

  • From nature, lucid dreams, the history of art and design, cultural – visual milieux.

Do you ever fear that you will run out of ideas?

  • No – never!  I fear I’ll run out on my life’s timeline.

Who do you do your art for:  yourself or an audience?

  • I do my art for myself because I can’t not do it:  it’s pervasive and permeates all that I am.   I like others to see the work and experience it.

How long does it take to complete a piece of art?

  • From 27 minutes all the way through to no boundaries of time (infinite).  Every project is unique.  Each one depends on process, and process depends on the following factors:  money, research, support, supplies, environment, market, resolution, time sensitivity, and the ‘Artist’s Zeitgeist’.

What was the last book that you read?  Did it influence your work?

  • ‘Second Sight’ by Judith Orloff, M.D.  Orloff is a psychiatrist and psychic who tells a compelling story revealing her courageous journey to embrace her psychic gifts.  All of us are born with psychic abilities and this ground-breaking book will show you how to recognize psychic experiences in your everyday life.  The book is hard to put down.  It’s had a powerful effect on me and I’ll likely see its influence on me as my work evolves.

Do you keep some of your art or give any of it away?

  • I donate at times to fundraisers.  Some has been given away.

Do you listen to music when you work?

  • Usually I have music playing.  I listen to jazz – sometimes blues or classical.

What do you mean by, “Harmony is a velvet universe?”

  • Years ago when I first said this, I believed peace could be universally achieved.  More recently I feel my belief to be purely utopian.  Warring parties have existed for-ever and my words are my wish, they’re my divine dream, my intent.  I want to fell weapons with mindfulness and love. Wesley, a student in yesterday’s class, has written: “As hard as we all try to make the world a perfect place it will never happen.  I once heard that angels need demons…and it’s true; how do we know we’re doing good if there is no bad to compare it to?” www.wesleyjbarisoff.blogspot.com February 17th, 2010 ‘is it just me or is it harder to breathe?

What specifically in the natural beauty of Vancouver inspired you with your work?

  • Mountains, the sea in all its moods, trees, flowers and flowering shrubs.  I have invented a color called: “Vancouver Grey.”  It is a distinct color I see all around me in our atmosphere.  This perfectly balanced neutral shade needs to be manufactured to compete with “Payne’s Gray”. “Vancouver Grey” weather makes an outstanding background for photographs; it reflects detail and adds extra depth.  Shoot when it’s overcast.

Who are your favorite artists?

  • Robert Rauschenberg, Louise Nevelson, Hannah Hoch, Alexander Calder, Edouard Manet…too many to list.  I used to sit for hours in the fine arts section of the Library at the University of British Columbia in the late nineties and pour through every book, over and over, page by page until my head was reeling with colors and lines and tangles of inspiration.  This old building that housed the library designated a large concrete room to visual arts.  I very much felt like I was below ground. The few windows were inside and small.  The glass was frosted and all the panes had chicken wire fastened over them.  I loved moving a stool along the aisles and sitting hunched over under flickering fluorescent lights dreaming of all I could construct.  I could hear the dark. The cold weather rained on the other side of the walls and this was like music to mentally create by. Strangely, I seemed to be the only one in there late at night which added another dimension to time and art absorbing me and taking me in fully.

When you were a child, did you dream of being who you are now?  How did your dreams and expectations shape the person you are today?

  • When I was a child I was skittish; abrupt noises, adults, energy fields…often caused me to experience anxiety, moods, and sometimes fatigue.  My dreams were relentless, aggressive toward me, and saturated with color.  I’m passionate about continually learning and doing new things; this has kept me shape-shifting as life unfolds.

What are your favorite styles in photography?

  • Still Life, Social Landscape, Street Photography, Milieux of Cities and People, Reflections, Fashion and Nudes.

What tools do you have “on-the-go” for inspiration?

  • Color always, and a jillion beads, trinkets, buttons, drawers full of saved paper, dried bones and flowers, one dead bird, photographs, magazines, books everywhere, my Maternal Grandmother’s Love Letters, rivers of sentimental clutter and a narrow path to navigate through.  Sometimes I feel “crazy overwhelmed” with it all, yet I know I would be depressed and despondent without it. These papered boxes, tablescapes, and shelves are reminisces of people, places, times, and everything in my life.  Even the insides of the cabinets look like collage.  As a full-time artist, I cannot relate to all my clutter as a conglomeration, when I can “legally” call it an “assemblage”.

When you write, do you prefer writing in a quiet place or do you write anywhere?

  • I write anywhere, everywhere; sometimes even as I walk. I always tuck a few index cards into my pocket or purse when I go out so I can make notes and record observations.

I love your poem about the pair of jeans.  What inspired you to write about that?

  • ‘A Pair of Jeans’, came through while I was sitting in a group at Emily Carr.  We had been meditating and doing warm-up exercises when this flowed through the tip of my pen.  Poetry comes through me at odd times.  I don’t sit down to write poems. Someone said the poem reminded her of Rita Wong’s voice in ‘monkeypuzzle’.

Wong’s poetry often addresses her relationship with her environment. Her poems show a close connection with nature and a support for local product, while expressing distaste for genetically modified foods. In forage, her poem ‘the girl who ate rice almost every day’ encourages the reader to look up Monsanto in the US patent database, and see how many patents there are for genetically modified foods, including the type of foods affected. There is also a poem, ‘canola queasy’ dedicated to Percy Schmeiser, the Saskatchewan farmer sued by Monsanto because genetically engineered canola blew into his fields. Her work challenges the reader to think about how they effect their environment. (Wikipedia). I see now from the excerpt above that Wong and I share the same sentiments regarding seeds as life and death.  Over the weekend I will post an image with text I’ve created Re:  Monsanto.

What advice do you have for young artists and designers?

  • Be 100% yourself!  Be authentic, explore, read, be curious.  Delve into photo and art history for inspiration, then put your own twist on it.

Having written this up as a blog, I noticed these questions could be used to draft an Artist Statement.  Go for it!!

Copyright © 2010 Nicole Rigets